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Over the last couple of days, the “World of CFD” has been buzzing about our recent acquisition of Red Cedar Technology. The word “acquisition” can sound a little frightening as it’s often associated with mis-management, changes to the way customers interact with vendors and a myriad of other oh so fearful changes. Anyone old enough to remember that debacle in the 1980’s between Bendix and Martin Marietta (one of the most complicated takeovers in corporate US history) knows what I’m talking about.

When it comes to systems, one of the most complex (and perhaps least understood) of all is that of the human body. The average adult human body is, on average, 57% - 60% water. That's a lot of fluid! So it stands to reason that CFD is a great tool for simulating the systems of things like medical implants, surgical techniques, diagnostic systems and the like.

A recent artilce published in Desktop Engineering examines how CFD is making an impact in the medical field. Our own Krisitan Debus Ph.D. talks about our work with an ASME sub-committee, writing verification and validation guidelines for biomedical devices as well as STAR-CCM+'s very useful overset mesh feature. Read the entire article here.

One of the best illustrations of "Simulating Systems" is this video from the STAR Global Conference 2013, in which Scott D. Reynolds of M/E Engineering explores the use of CFD for studying the impact of wind on the built environment.

Asked to examine the influence of helicopter exhaust plumes  on surrounding bulidings, M/E Engineering decided to simulate the whole system, including fully unsteady wind profiles (with gusts that vary in speed and direction), and the full complexity of the local urban landscape. Best of all, the simulation includes an actual moving helicopter that entrains gas from nearby building plumes as it takes off and lands.

 

As a follow up to yesterday's post, here's a presentation from the 2013 STAR Global Conference which took place in Orlando, FL this past March.  Michael Carl of Rowan Williams Davis & Irwin, Inc., shows how STAR-CCM+ was used to evaluate the egress system on a bus deck during a fire. The system was simulated as a whole as well as sectionally, including wind, fire and water from the sprinklers.

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Stephen Ferguson
Communications Manager
Dr Mesh
Meshing Guru
Brigid Blaschak
Communications Specialist
Sabine Goodwin
Senior Engineer, Technical Marketing
Jean-Claude Ercolanelli
Senior Vice President, Product Management at CD-adapco
Bob Ryan
President Red Cedar Technology
Joel Davison
Product Manager, STAR-CCM+
Deborah Eppel
Technical Marketing Engineer

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