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CD-adapco is pleased to announce the release of v4.22 of STAR-CD and es-ice IC Engine simulation software. The v4.22 release provides extensive refinements to existing physics models and pre-processing developments to deliver rapid and more accurate in-cylinder simulation.
Accelerating the design of next generation electromagnetic devices New York and London. July 21, 2014 CD-adapco™, the largest privately held CFD focused provider of Computer Aided Engineering software, announced they have signed a collaborative development agreement with JSOL, the authors of the JMAG electromagnetics code, to jointly develop co-simulation methods in the domain to coupled thermal & electromagnetic simulations. Jean-Claude Ercolanelli, CD-adapco Senior Vice President Product Management, comments, “Enabling the co-simulation of both thermal and electromagnet phenomena using...
Are Erosion Problems Wearing You Down?
Pipework erosion is increasingly becoming an issue within the oil and gas industry. Many assets are ageing and statistics suggest that the majority of wells now produce sand. New, high-rate subsea wells are particularly vulnerable to erosion, and the consequences of failure are significant. CFD technology provides a key tool to better understand erosion and thus optimize the design of production systems, reduce risk and ultimately increase our customers' profits. The presentation provides overview of erosion assessment at Xodus: How CFD is used to refine our understanding of erosion in oil...
Kookmin University Formula SAE Team
The FSAE Team from Korea's Kookmin University, vastly improved their performance through the application of STAR-CCM+ CFD simulation.
CFD Simulation of Wake Behind Adidas Brazuca Soccer Ball at 50mph
STAR-CCM+ was used to study the behavior of Brazuca at 50 mph using CFD. The model is courtesy of www.grabcad.com and is a representative model of the actual ball. We meshed the Brazuca in STAR-CCM+ using the Overset Mesh technology and ran a Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) of the flow over the stationary ball at 50mph. A DES simulation is necessary to accurately capture the turbulent eddies in the wake region. In the animation below, you can clearly see that while there is still some unsteadiness and asymmetry in the wake region behind the ball, the wake doesn’t wildly fluctuate and oscillate...
CFD Simulation of Soccer Ball Knuckling
In baseball, a knuckle ball is often used where the pitcher doesn’t impart any spin on the ball and the Gods of Aerodynamics will take care of the rest. So what is knuckling exactly? When a soccer ball is kicked, the air flowing over the ball ‘hugs’ the ball tightly forming what is called a ‘boundary layer’ over the ball. The roughness of the ball and the depth of the seams will then affect this boundary layer which determines the motion of the ball. When a ball is kicked with little or no spin, the air flowing over the ball is ‘tripped’ by the seams and separates from the ball, forming a region of wake behind it. The unsteadiness of the wake behind the ball is what pushes it into an unsteady flight path. The ball may oscillate from left to right or up and down when kicked and the trajectory of such a kick is hard to predict for the kickers and goalkeepers alike. During knuckling, the unsteady wake behind the ball will oscillate in direction leading to lift and side forces on the ball moving from one direction to the other. Recently, researchers have shown that the Brazuca knuckles less at 50 mph, the average speed with which free kicks are taken and hence is better than the Jabulani.
CFD Simulation of Soccer Ball Knuckling
In baseball, a knuckle ball is often used where the pitcher doesn’t impart any spin on the ball and the Gods of Aerodynamics will take care of the rest. So what is knuckling exactly? When a soccer ball is kicked, the air flowing over the ball ‘hugs’ the ball tightly forming what is called a ‘boundary layer’ over the ball. The roughness of the ball and the depth of the seams will then affect this boundary layer which determines the motion of the ball. When a ball is kicked with little or no spin, the air flowing over the ball is ‘tripped’ by the seams and separates from the ball, forming a region of wake behind it. The unsteadiness of the wake behind the ball is what pushes it into an unsteady flight path. The ball may oscillate from left to right or up and down when kicked and the trajectory of such a kick is hard to predict for the kickers and goalkeepers alike. During knuckling, the unsteady wake behind the ball will oscillate in direction leading to lift and side forces on the ball moving from one direction to the other. Recently, researchers have shown that the Brazuca knuckles less at 50 mph, the average speed with which free kicks are taken and hence is better than the Jabulani.
My involvement in the World Cup is a little more personal since my first project at CD-adapco involved the aerodynamics of soccer balls. The 2010 World Cup ball, the Adidas Jabulani, had its fair share of criticism due to its shallower seams and 8-panel design leading to erratic flight paths. The ball was difficult to control for the players and rumors have it that some goalkeepers still have recurring nightmares of the ball. In 2010, CD-adapco teamed up with Wilson Sporting Goods to study the aerodynamic behavior of soccer balls and the impact of the newer panel designs.
Wake behind Adidas Brazuca ball at 50 mph - Side View
Wake behind Adidas Brazuca ball at 50 mph - Side View

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